Tag Archives: diversity

A Distance From Calcutta by P.J. Barry: An Analysis for Production

Buddy: You’re waiting for a prince to come along and carry you off on his white horse. (Pause) I’m no prince. I’m more like a frog,” (p 100)

On a page of canned quotes, I found:
Everyone deserves to laugh, to be happy, and to be loved…but not everyone gets what they deserve.”

How true. Our cultures and our courts have been crammed with controversy concerning the right to marry since at least 1888 (Maynard v. Hill, USA). I have known same gender, multi-ethnic, and multi-cultural/religion married couples. Before the twentieth century, in the United States and beyond, marrying (and re-marrying) outside one’s race, reflective gender, culture, religion, and even social-economic class was considered taboo, forbidden, even illegal. What if you loved someone, but due to “what is proper” you couldn’t give yourself to them completely and publicly?

Originally produced in 1993, and set 70 years before that, A Distance from Calcutta by P.J. Barry dramatizes this century-old conflict but sets it far away from the modern court and melee of marriage rights. The play never intended to be included in the debate. Here the action rises gently, almost reluctantly, but sweetly, and reaches its sad and complex climax in a barely middle class Irish Catholic home in the village of Jericho, Rhode Island. Our equally-Caucasian star-crossed lovers are a “spinster” and a handyman with a “learning handicap.” Viewed through a contemporary lens, the rejection and prohibition seem almost petty. The plot is complicated with several conundrums. Maggie, the maiden sister’s brother has married a woman considered outside his social class (a teacher no less!). Buddy, the handyman, is not only very mechanically inclined and resourceful, but also a veteran who is emotionally perceptive with a keen memory for facts and conversations. He’s just popularly and locally known, by his own admission, as “not smart.”

There were then, and still are, no laws prohibiting their lives together. Still yet, there softly speaks the question, “Would YOU want/allow YOUR sister/daughter/self to marry a man so particularly “special?” What would people think?

Cast: 3 women, 2 men
Set: Single interior: 1923 middle class home: living/dining and visible 2nd floor bedroom
Costumes: Approximately 3 changes for each. Some “Sunday clothing.” Pregnant belly.
Royalties: Minimum Fee: $75 per performance
Running Time: unable 1 hours, 59 minutes

Pros: Small cast with 2 good, 1 excellent part for women 35- 58 and an excellent starring role for a non-traditional male lead. One set; fits in most small theatres. It is an excellent starting point for conversations after the theatre and about equality. NOT SET IN NYC!

Cons: There is little action and the play depends much on dialogue and understated characters. The play has had no recent regional productions to spur interest.

Censorial concerns: Implied sexual intercourse.

Provenance:
Produced at least twice in NYC, once in Newport Beach California.

Playwright:
http://pjbarry.net/Biography.html

Reviews:
Fair: http://www.nytimes.com/1993/01/25/theater/review-theater-the-ties-that-bind-and-bind-too-tightly.html

Harsh: http://articles.latimes.com/1996-02-27/entertainment/ca-40655_1_newport-theatre-arts-center

Recommendation: The more I write about it, the more I like it. It would be best as part of a series of plays about issues of equality and/or disability. Being that it was proposed to be part of series of pieces set in Jericho, RI ( After the Dancing in Jericho, And Fat Freddy’s Blues), perhaps it might be part of a series of “visits” by a theatre company over one season or multiple seasons, not unlike The Talley Trilogy by Lanford Wilson.

Highly recommended reading: Theatre Alberta’s guide will assist you in finding plays tackling issues related to physical or mental disabilities.

Purchase:
http://www.samuelfrench.com/p/1250/distance-from-calcutta-a

Available for lending from Illinois State University and Eastern Illinois University

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American Hero by Bess Wohl (2013): an analysis for production

“What happens to a dream deferred? … Does it stink like rotten meat? … Or does it explode?” from Harlem by Langston Hughes

This is NOT “A Raisin in the Sun.” The American Hero of the title is a sandwich. This Hero appears but once in a dream. Otherwise our characters, symbols of the American dream deferred, all find this Hero equally ironic and elusive. It is a brilliant and convenient choice that a black comedy (no pun on Langston Hughes) about the current American economic condition unifies its action in a thinly veiled “toasty sub” sandwich franchise, with three “sandwich artists” abandoned by both their owner and corporate. The literal meat in American Hero never rots; it just runs out leaving the characters adrift and improvising. A farce by definition is “a light dramatic composition marked by broadly satirical comedy and improbable plot (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/farce, 3/23/2015 5:58 PM).” Bess Wohl’s dialogue is honest, economical and prosaic. American Hero is, on many levels, an anti-farce: an acutely satirical comedy, with three ordinary people (no mayors, cops, or opera singers) in a probable situation, who reveal heavy truths.

Sherry: But I just want to like, do my job here and not get fired with the least amount of energy possible so I can have energy left over for the taco place, which is where my real passion lies.

Ted: But what about school or—

Sherry: I’m 18 and anyway, I am not, you know—

Ted: What?

Sheri: Smart.

Equally depressing (recessing?), the “Ted” in previous dialogue is a corporate casualty with an MBA. Jamie, the third protagonist is a wise-cracking vixen with her own sad secret who abuses what she thinks is her only power, sexuality. The antagonists of Hero turn out to be the unseen peddlers of “The American Dream,” who feign to reward ingenuity and industry but instead sacrifice “heroes” in the pursuit of profit.

Jamie:   No, seriously, this is kind of like a dream come true. Ever since I was a little girl I just love sliced meats.

Ted:       Right, well, good for you.

Jamie:   Plus like a month ago, I got fucking fired from Supercuts. You know the one of the Fairview Mall?

Ted:       Sure, yeah, I’ve been there.

Jamie:   Did they give you that haircut?

Ted:       Oh. Actually, yeah, I think so.

Jamie:   Fucking Darlene. Anyway, they said I was stealing mousse. Allegedly.

Ted:       The hair product?

Jamie:   The animal. So yeah, they were pissed, but for like six weeks, my hair had incredible volume and lift.

Provenance:

Bess Wohl:

  • Winner of the 2004 New York International Fringe Festival.
  • Developed television pilots for both networks and cable.
  • BA: English: Harvard University, Magna Cum Laude,
  • MFA: Acting: Yale School of Drama.
  • Rona Jaffe Writing Prize
  • Macdowell Fellowship
  • Plays written include: Cats Talk Back, In, Touched, Barcelona, American Hero

(imdb.com, playpenn.org/our-playwrights)

Play:

Williamstown, NYC, Boston

Production requirements: Reasonable, but may be economically challenging for small theatrical companies. The cast is 4 or 7 (2 or 5m, 2F) with characters aged 18-40. One male actor, who should pass as North African or Southeast Asian, played all supporting parts in listed productions. The setting is a new, very realistic fast-food sandwich franchise. This must be complete with real food, a working soda machine, prep station/counter, new matching tables and chairs, and large highly stylized possibly photographic poster/advertisements. It must look like a brand new Quizno’s™ or Subway™. Action is divided into 12 scenes with no assigned act break. Running time for the New York production was 1 hour and 30 minutes (The New York Times, 2014). Most costumes are contemporary and simple (street clothes, suit with breakaway tear, uniforms…and an anthropomorphic sandwich). Royalties: $100 per performance.

Censorial concerns: “Fuck”: Several instances. “Shit”: occasionally (3?). A sexual liaison replete with commensurate vocalizations begins onstage as lights fade and the scene changes (no nudity).

Recommendation: STRONG. The playwright is female and American. The setting is any medium city to suburb large enough to have several of the same chain sandwich shop and is NOT (necessarily) NEW YORK!!!! The timely themes of corporate greed, brand inanity, underemployment, and economic desperation resonate as good, or better, than many of the works recently reviewed on this blog. The biting comedy will entertain, motivate and enlighten audiences. The acting parts are rewarding: round, layered, and take strong character and relationship work. If your theatre can get their hands on some of the restaurant supplies from a recently closed establishment, and your board can cover their ears for the F-bomb, it’s worth the gamble.

http://www.dramatists.com/cgi-bin/db/single.asp?key=5057

Available for lending from Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois

Stop Kiss by Diana Son: an analysis for production

I first discovered this work while skimming other small theatre blogs. Imagine my pleasure that while skimming the “812.5s” at my local library, I discovered the play within our collection! I presume there was visionary librarian in Pleasantville in February 2000, when this gem of a play is indicated to have found a home here.

Stop Kiss is a light girl-meets-girl comedy that trips and falls hard into the not-quite-ready cruel world. Sara and Callie never planned on meeting, and may have never considered an affair, had their meeting never happened. The result is the true awkwardness of two people surprised by love captured within the beautiful yet ungraceful speech patterns of 20th century. Unfortunately that blossoming beauty is interrupted by a senseless act of violence that forces public definition upon two people who have yet to define what they have. Friends and family are mystified and well-meaning. Callie herself is at once exhilarated, surprised and confused.

The action is presented out of sequence, much in the style of Proof (Auburn). The juxtaposition of the non-linear scenes however aides to focus the viewer on both the beauty and the tragedy at once. We fear for the characters, knowing their fate before they do, on so many levels. The final scene ends with Sara and Callie’s awkward first kiss. We, the audience already know that this tenderness is fated to be followed by brutality. It is that brutality that forces definition. Perhaps definition of love is the most subtle and insidious brutality.

Production requirements are all feasible for most theatrical companies. It is best suited to a small stage. The cast is 6/7 (3m, 3/4f) with an age range from late 20’s to mid 40s. There are no ethnic restrictions. Several settings must be done simply as the scenes flow quickly: apartment, hospital examination, hospital room, police station house, hospital waiting room, street scene. The action is designed to be performed without intermission. Any props or costumes are contemporary: one nurse, one police detective. A series of vulgar epithets are repeated as Sara must repeatedly recount the attacker’s slurs. Editing for vulgarity would be ridiculous. Royalties are $80 per performance.

My recommendations are strong. The playwright is an American and a woman of color. The setting is again regrettably New York. However, the city of acceptance and opportunity seems in short supply of both. The irony makes the play more relatable to a broad audience. My community theatre isn’t brave enough…yet. I hope that yours is right now.

Provenance:

Diana Son is a producer and writer, known for Law & Order: Criminal Intent (2001), Blue Bloods (2010) and Love Is a Four-Letter Word (2015) http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1788547/ . She is the recipient of an NEA/TCG Theatre Residency Grant with the Mark Taper Forum, and a Brooks Atkinson Fellowship at the Royal National Theatre in London, and a member of the Playwrights Unit in Residence at the Joseph Papp Public Theater.

Son’s full length debut Stop Kiss was critically acclaimed. The play was produced Off-Broadway in 1998 at The Public Theater in New York City. It was extended three times. The play has been produced by hundreds of theaters since its initial run. In 2014, Stop Kiss was produced at the Pasadena Playhouse where it made the Los Angeles Times’ “Best of 2014” list1.

http://www.dramatists.com/cgi-bin/db/single.asp?key=2871

Available for lending from The Princeton Public Library, Princeton, IL

  1. McNulty, Charles (19 December 2014). “Charles McNulty’s best stage shows of 2014”. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 18 January 2015.

PUSH THE ENVELOPE!

MyWebTimes: June 24, 2004:

‘SubUrbia’ to be staged at IVCC

“OGLESBY — Students of Performing Arts and Music Organization (SPAMO) and Vs. Productions will present the Eric Bogosian comedy-drama “SubUrbia,” 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday (June 25& 26, 2004) at the Illinois Valley Community College Cultural Centre.

According to information submitted by IVCC, “SubUrbia” zeroes in on today’s youth, depicting the rudderless yearnings and amorphous rage of a lost generation. It is the story of high school friends, lingering in the northwestern industrial town of Burnfield long after graduation, who find themselves lost amid the shuffle of suburban life.

Directed by Dave Roden, the play contains strong adult language and themes. Tickets can be purchased at a discount by IVCC students who show their student identification cards.”

Ten and a half years ago, a group of young actors asked that I direct a student production at a local community college. They had considered a more conservative piece, but elected instead to take a chance and expand their own and their community’s horizons. Eric Bogosian’s SubUrbia, a vulgarity ridden, adrenaline infused modern Three Sisters gave birth to my improvisational directing style and filled a LIVE THEATRE with hundreds of paying customers under the age of 25. It took 10 more years for Rent (Stage 212, directed by DJ Haun and starring my production’s Jeff as Roger) to hit local stages and SELL OUT a 4 show weekend run. It can be done.

The core patrons of community theatre are traditionalists. If yours are anything like ours, the typical consumer is female, 60, church-going, politically conservative and blue-collar. Their exposure to theatre is the theatre that your organization presents. Once or twice a year, many may venture (via bus tour) to a larger city to see the one-night-only tour of a recently popular musical. I’m not insulting them; I’m honest. That said, I would never imply that these people are one-dimensional. Our community is filled with veterans of horrible wars, countless financial depressions and recessions, industry boom and bust, corporate poisoning of their environment and their bodies, as well as the joys of (European) cultural diversity, and family and community life. They deserve to be honored for their complexity.

There are also the underserved markets. I have no doubt that many ticket holders for Rent, were the same as the ticket holders for SubUrbia. They were older, but now have jobs, homes and entertainment dollars to spend. Our future audience and our core audience deserve the opportunity to be challenged by rich, fresh content. If we don’t give it to them, they will spend their dollars elsewhere. I’m sure that my 80 year old mother can order Twelve Years a Slave and send it directly to her living room. She will understand it, empathizes with its actors, and be moved by its story. Imagine if we gave her the opportunity to literally share those moments with live actors from her own community in real time in This Is Our Youth, The Open House, or Collected Stories.

Community theatres PUSH THE ENVELOPE! Great theatre was written after 1975. Fad farces and 1950’s musicals are a fun dessert, but let’s not forget the entrée. I call upon all theatres to have one work in their season which was written in the last 10 years, and for it to be performed UNEDITED with a full budget! It need not have a 3-week run or even be part of the season ticket package. It must needs BE THERE. Without innovation we starve as artists and neglect our patrons. Get crackin’!

Tea and Sympathy: How far have we grown?

Originally published in FaceBook Notes

January 28, 2014 at 12:18pm

I must admit, I typically only spend time reading plays that I think I can submit for performance locally. I read the character list and stop when I find a black character (I believe I have cast the only black person locally, Rent 2015 makes 2). I stop when I see a need for for numerous actors (casting and scheduling six actors is often more than enough of nightmare). I read the set description, and stop when it calls for multiple realistic settings. I especially stop when the tally of words on the “no-no list” exceeds what I perceive as the censors’ line in the sand. I’m not proud, just practical.

Being home bound by the cold, I pulled out my 50 Best Plays of the American Theatre (selected by Clive Barnes, 1969, Crown Publishers, NY). Inside I found a play with a single interior set design, a cast of 11 (on my high side), with no characters of color, and dialogue which may not even contain the word “damn.” Yet I’m still left wondering if this poignant drama might get more than a reading at a coffee shop around here.

Tea and Sympathy by Robert Anderson was first produced on Broadway in 1953. The play deals with malicious suspicion, culturally sanctioned harassment, and the persistent, pervasive and dubious definition of masculinity that still drives people to commit the first two crimes on this list. Its progression of events, and implied social impact on the life’s of its characters may seem more firmly rooted in the time period of the play in an era that makes a great show of tolerance. The crimes of the heart and mind, however, still linger. As a school social worker I am routinely employed in healing the damage.

Obstacles other than subject matter: Finding a young man locally who looks the part of the 17 1/2 year old protagonist and is also brave enough to take on the role may prove difficult. NOTE: It’s not certain if ANYONE in the play identifies as homosexual! It also calls for 4-5 more prep school boy-actors which might be harder to find around here than at a girls’ boarding school. There is also one implied romantic encounter between a 23 year old woman and the protagonist. Of course we’ve seen adults hop in an out of myriad romantic encounters in an endless steam of bedroom farces. We’ve laughed it up when the stereotypical upstairs neighbor “poof” waltzes into the fray. Oh how we roared when two male actors wrestled into a position of implied sodomy! This play however might reveal how little we’ve really grown in 60 years.

http://www.samuelfrench.com/p/1038/tea-and-sympathy